+255 756 741 238 info@pamojakilisafaris.com
+255 756 741 238 info@pamojakilisafaris.com

How we deal to help to reduce altitude sickness

How we deal to help to reduce the affects of altitude sickness in our customers’ Pamoja Kilimanjaro & Safari’s we have a trained medical guides who has a knowledge of monitoring our customers’ health. At least twice a day our medically trained guides check your oxygen saturation by using a pulse oximeter and we use a stethoscope to check for fluids in your lungs. After breakfast and after dinner, our guides ask standard questions about your health, especially related to altitude sickness symptoms.

Altitude sickness occurs when you cannot get enough oxygen from the air at high altitudes. When you don’t get enough oxygen you may experience a range of symptoms such as headache, loss of appetite, and trouble sleeping.

Be patient and listen to your body

In fact, we keep a log of your health to make sure we are paying close attention to any changes. To ensure a safe climb, we encourage all of our customers to be patient and listen to their bodies. If you experience mild AMS symptoms, we will work with you to slow down the pace of the trek and encourage you to drink more fluids and consume more food. Our guides are there to support you every step of the way. The only definitive treatment for high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), another form of mountain sickness characterized by brain swelling, is descent.

Anybody can get altitude sickness, but data suggest that when people who are not used to high altitudes go quickly from lower altitudes to about 2500m (about 8,000 ft) or higher are more likely to experience symptoms.

Treatment for high altitude

In fact, we keep a log of your health to make sure we are paying close attention to any changes. To ensure a safe climb, we encourage all of our customers to be patient and listen to their bodies. If you experience mild AMS symptoms, we will work with you to slow down the pace of the trek and encourage you to drink more fluids and consume more food. Our guides are there to support you every step of the way.

The only definitive treatment for high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), another form of mountain sickness characterized by brain swelling, is descent.

On the other hand, Diamox (acetazolamide) OR Dexamethasone or (Decadron, a steroid) may be beneficial.

Generally, if dexamethasone is considered, then a plan for descent should be in place unless descent is impossible. Some people, after receiving dexamethasone, may feel so much better that they want to continue ascending. Under no circumstance should this be allowed.

  • Oxygen may be helpful.
  • A Gamow bag may buy time until descent is possible. Anyone with HACE or HAPE should be kept as comfortable as possible.
  • Exertion of any type should be minimized, even during descent.
  • This means that it may be necessary to arrange descent for the ill person by whatever means available (helicopter, or snowmobile.)

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